Sunday, 24 June 2018

Taylors of Loughborough and more!

This week has been another of those rollercoaster type weeks that serves to remind me of what's important in life. 

On Thursday I went out for a farewell meal with a bunch of work colleagues, some of whom were retiring. Some had firm plans for how they were going to spend their retirement, others were a bit more undecided, or rather, were going to go with the flow. Of course, the usual "we'll keep in touch" and "we'll pop back and see you" comments were made, but we all know how difficult it is to keep in contact with people when you no longer see them everyday, and they live the other side of Leicester! Still, I hope they remember all the good things that happened at work, and enjoy their retirement. 

On Friday I said a farewell of a different kind, a lady who was described as being Loughborough through and through, having been born only 400 yards away from where she died. It was both a sad and a joyful occasion, sad that I had only known this lady for 6 years, but joyful because we were celebrating her life - and wearing bright colours to keep us all as cheerful as possible. It made me realise how little I know about anything, and how important it is to ask before it's too late.

On Saturday members of my family and I travelled to the Cotswolds to meet up with relatives from the States who I hadn't seen since the very early 1970s, and who some of my family had never before met. It was an afternoon/evening meet up, and since we arrived a little early, we had a look around the local motor museum. That was super - loads of old cars, old metal signs, old toys, and much, much more! 

I couldn't however, at the time, find any Loughborough connections, that is, until I came to write this post!!! So, I spotted the name Onions, a popular name in Loughborough, and one part of the Birmingham engineering and iron founding company, established in the 1650s, which was named Alldays and Onions. I suppose the fact that the museum was in an old mill reminded me of Cotes Mill (a pub when I first came to Loughborough, but now a kitchen makers). And that the museum used ladybird stickers to share facts with the youngsters reminded me of Ladybird Books. Oh, and there was a Ladybird Book on display. And the fact that the woollen trade was an important one in the Cotswolds, just as it was in Loughborough. And one of the scooters on display reminded me of the bike event in the Market Place a couple of weekends ago! 

One other thing I spotted were three out-of-place milestones: I have a thing about milestones, and these certainly reminded me of one of Loughborough's. So, quite a few connections now I've thought about it! I've put some of the relevant photos at the end of this post.

So, onto the family gathering! I was so pleased to meet my uncle again, because it is he who plays the carillon in St Peter's Episcopal Church in Morristown, New Jersey, twice every Sunday and at various other times. He told me all about the Taylors bells they have, which were made in 1924, just after our very own Carillon was constructed. The St Peter's carillon now has 49 bells - that's two more than ours, but it started with only 36 in 1924, increasing to 47 by 1955, and to 49 by 1993. I believe the later bells were made in France, by Paccard/Bigelow and Petit & Fritsen.

There are 100 steps up the tower to the carillon in St Peter's church, and in order to make the ascent and descent safer, a handrail has now been added. Sadly, so far there has been no luck in finding a successor to make a committment to play regulalry in order that my uncle may "retire". Not that he wants to, but the climb is becoming increasingly difficult for him. Here's a video of him explaining about the carillon, a report of an event at which two guest carillonneurs played (with some lovely photos), and another short article featuring my uncle.   

Anyway, back at the gathering, I got talking to loads of people I'd not met before, and was pleased that people had heard of Loughborough, through its university's sporting heroes. But, imagine my surprise when I discovered that a gentleman at the gathering had actually worked at Herbert Morris - back in the day, as they say!!! He would arrive in Loughborough on a Monday, work until the end of Friday and then travel home again. Sadly, I didn't think to ask him where he stayed during the week, but it was great to talk to him! And that's just reminded me - there was something at the motor museum with a Loughborough connection and a Morris connection too: a model airship, just like the Zeppelins of 1916!!           










Hello Bro!!

The three chemists!

A former Morris employee!!!!

Siblings

Pensive moment

Siblings!

You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2018). What a milestone! Available fromhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2018/06/taylors-of-loughborough-and-more.html  [Accessed 24 June 2018]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 

Lynne  

Sunday, 17 June 2018

Popular surnames

Sadly I missed the Loughborough Car Show 2018, taking place in the Market Place today, but I hope you can forgive me as I took time out to visit the motorbike show and post loads of pics a couple of weeks ago.

This week I found myself on the outskirts of Coventry, an interesting experience as we were near a place called Cannons Park (complete with a canon from the 1600s) and Canley, having driven along Gibbet Hill Road, and walked along Lynchgate and De Montfort Way. The area around Canley has an interesting history (more here) and I was right to be interested because there was a lot of Civil War action here, just as there was at Cotes near Loughborough. But what caught my eye most was the information board at the entrance to the Prior Deram Park, which talked of the land being inhabited from Anglo-Saxon times, and once owned by Henrys I and VIII. Land around the area was known as Fletchamstead, after the trade of arrow-making which was prevalent in the area.

Here's a few pictures before we get onto the main content of this post:

A beautiful car I saw on Saturday



The 1600s canon

The dedication plaque

Information about Prior Deram Park


This got me thinking about surnames, and what they mean, and what our popular local Loughborough ones might mean, or where they originated. So, Fletcher comes from the trade of arrow-making, but what about others?

Not quite knowing where to start, I had a think about some popular surnames of which I was aware, and tried to identify where families bearing these names were mostly living. Varying degrees of success with this, so, for example, there were not enough Lemyngtons and Burnabys to produce any conclusive evidence, but other names were easier to locate. Note of caution: this work is in its infancy and I've only checked in a few sources, not comprehensively - yet!!

Adcock

  • centred around Grantham and radiating outwards

Adkin

  • most popular slightly north of Nottingham, and predominantly between Nottingham & Loughborough. Also around Lanarkshire

Alcock

  • Stoke-on-Trent and radiating outwards

Amatt

  • Reading, Nottingham, Dorset and Wolverhampton

Barrowcliff

  • mostly Dorset, and ranging from Nottingham to Kingston-Upon-Hull

Beaumont

  • predominantly Leeds

Birkin

  • Nottingham and radiating outwards

Bumpus

  • only found in Norwich

Burder

  • around Ipswich, slightly in Hastings, Luton, Oxford and Leicestershire

Burton

  • Northampton to Stoke-on-Tret to Lincoln to Kingston-on-Hull, and Dundee

Cartwright

  • Wolverhampton and radiating outwards

Corah

  • Leicestershire & Nottinghamshire

Corcoran

  • Manchester, Stoke-on-Trent, Swansea, Northern Ireland and Kirkcudbright

Cotton

  • Stoke-on-Trent and Lincoln

Craddock 

  • Stoke-on-Trent

De Lisle

  • Leicestershire

Dean

  • Stoke-on-Trent and York

Eddowes

  • predominantly Telford/Birmingham, with bits in Northamptonshire and Holyhead

Fearon

  • South of Belfast, and Carlisle

Garton

  • Grantham and Peterborough

Grey

  • North of Newcastle and between Gloucester and Bristol

Griggs

  • predominantly Suffolk, heading towards Peterborough

Grudgings

  • slightly west of Andover, mostly Northern Ireland, south of Londonderry, near Enniskillen

Hames

  • Nottinghamshire and radiating outwards, and Telford 

Hastings

  • Dumfries

Heathcoat

  • Worcester, Swindon and Wilton

Hepworth

  • Leeds and radiating outwards

Hodson

  • east of Leicestershire and predominantly Peterborough

Lowe

  • band across the middle of the country Birmingham up to Manchester, through Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire to Lincoln

Messenger

  • Carlisle

Middleton

  • slightly west of Kendal and radiating outwards

Moss

  • between Stoke-on-Trent/Manchester, and south of Londonderry

Onions

  • slightly east of Wolverhampton and radiating outwards

Paget

  • predominantly west of Aberdeen and a few near Bristol

Paltridge

  • Carmarthen and radiating outwards and Exeter

Peberdy

  • Glasgow and a few in Nottingham

Storer

  • Leicestershire and radiating outwards

Toon

  • Leicesterhire and radiating outwards

Tucker

  • Devon

Vavasour

  • predominantly Wye in Kent then Leicestershire

Wakerley

  • Melton Mowbray and radiating outwards

Warner

  • Gloucester and radiating outwards, and Ipswich

Wills

  • Bodmin and radiating outwards

Woolley

  • Stoke-on-Trent

Ok, so now it's the witching hour and I should be away! I'll update further next week!

You are welcome to quote passages from any of my posts, with appropriate credit. The correct citation for this looks as follow:

Dyer, Lynne (2018). Popular surnames. Available fromhttps://lynneaboutloughborough.blogspot.com/2018/06/popular-surnames.html  [Accessed 17 June 2018]

Take down policy:
I post no pictures that are not my own, unless I have express permission so to do. All text is my own, and not copied from any other information sources, printed or electronic, unless identified and credited as such. If you find I have posted something in contravention of these statements, or if there are photographs of you which you would prefer not to be here, please contact me at the address listed on the About Me page, and I will remove these.
Thank you for reading this blog. 

Lynne